All About Campfire Cooking


#1

I just did a quick search for campfire/camp cooking and did not find anything.

Maybe this would be better posted at the beginning of summer, but I am headed on a camping trip this weekend and would like to eat well!

Let’s do this!

  • What are your go-to campfire meals & recipes? Photos please!
  • What are your must-have campfire cooking tools? What do you use them for?

#2

First off a shovel to move the coals around , also a 5 gallon bucket to fill with water to put the fire out , can also be used to wash pots or dishes. Bring some big garbage bags for trash . My go to is chicken thighs and drumsticks. Low and slow .


#3

Went camping for the first time a few weeks ago in Big Bear. A very popular option was a pot to boil water and instant ramen. Kids and adults alike are lots of ramen that weekend.

I didn’t really know what to expect but the next time I go camping I’m going to bring potatoes wrapped in foil for baked potatoes and pre-cooked chili that can easily reheat on the fire. If your campsite has a fire pit with a big grate over it you can grill proteins over the grate but the gaps are pretty big. If I’m feeling adventurous I might bring my own grate and cook burgers or steak.


#4

Here’s a link:

One of our daughters and her family go “off the grid” for a week or more. I’ll have to ask her what they do.


#5

Campfire cooking can be a participation thing.

Maybe a stew reheated, with a salad, bread.

Hash; based on: roast beef,or corned beef, or sausage.

Jiffy Pop

Soomores (sp?)

Cast iron cookware.


#6

S’mores. Short for “some more,” as in “I want some more,” if my looooong ago Girl Scout troop leader is a credible source.


#7

Yep.

https://headsup.boyslife.org/whats-history-smores/

It seems they were or are somewhat trendy, with some restaurants have the setup for dessert.


#8

Two short but fun videos about Francis Mallmann that make me want to learn more about outdoor fire:

Seven Fires with Francis Mallmann
How to Make the Best Breakfast with Ed Lee and Francis Mallmann


#9

Steaks, lunch meats/cheese, ramen, Dinty Moore beef stew, hot dogs, bags of salad/salad dressings. Just a small sample.

A shelf stable necessity, SPAM!!!

Spam/eggs/toast. And A 12 oz Bud. Breakfast of Champions!!!

Pan fried T-bone and canned corn by campfire light.

Chinese camping. Fresh cooked rice with canned fried dace w/black beans by Coleman lantern light.


#10

A percolater!


#11

Spam - YES!!!


#12

I’d go for cold brew aka Toddy. We travel with it all the time and have for over 30 years.

https://toddycafe.com/


#13

FWIW, my checklist for a fishing/camping trip to Clear Lake, CA.

Our lakeside lodge with a view:

Designated pantry area:

Professional chef’s kitchen: :slight_smile:

Library study with fireplace:

Working hard for dinner:

Fish. It’s what’s for dinner:


#14

I thought that trend was dead, but nope:

Granted, some of that list is s’mores-style something else, but still.


#15

I think you and my dad would’ve gotten along great. You remembered the duct tape. :slight_smile:


#16

I’m so UN-trendy that I didn’t want to guess :smile:


#17

I’m going to copy that list and show to our daughter…the one who ‘camps’ in the shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge, not the one who goes off the grid LOL!


#18

Who knew you were the camping Doppelgänger of @chandavkl


#19

Menu varies with locale. It’s different for backpacking vs.car camping; somewhere with a pit vs. building up a pile of rocks.

I like to fish, so trout is first and foremost. This summer I field tested a shichimi togarishi for seasoning. First trip, I only used blood orange zest and the second a blend of orange, lemon and a dash of lime zest. Blood orange for the win. Heaping portions of black sesame and poppy seeds to make it super crunchy and a basic ichimi togarishi to make sure it felt familiar, ginger, sichuan peppercorn, nori. This was for backpacking so sometimes there would be a ‘donated’ grill and sometimes there wouldn’t. Didn’t matter as trout were wrapped in tinfoil after being dressed. Could throw them right in the coals.

If you’ve got the patience, trip-tip is nice for a big group. Santa Maria style. Par-smoking low and slow for an hour or two usually nets a pretty good result.

Leg of lamb is pretty forgiving over fire. Nice with a jerk rub.

Never underestimate the delicious utility of a hot dog.


#20

I’m so going to send the trout thing to our daughter. Sounds terrific although not sure the 2 and 6 y.o.'s will eat it. Pre-kiddos their backpacking usually including some climbing also but nowadays it’s mostly just backpacking with some canoeing etc. thrown in for good measure. Thanks a lot.