Colatura di Alici? Where to buy in Los Angeles?


#21

I know, right?

Plus, Koenigsegg is so damn low it won’t even make clearance at the street/driveway interface without a $10K+ undercarriage scratch. Yeesh. That egg run just got EGGSpensive (see what I did there?)…

And this is why we raise backyard chickens.


#22

No, I’ve done it before.

The lemon balances it out, and Colatura is not really fishy to me, at least not quality Colatura.


#23

I always learn something new on this board. I didn’t know the Italians had their own version of fish sauce…and I just saw it on a rerun of Zimmern’s Bizarre show tonight, too.


#24

Bay City.


#25

This is also my experience with colatura and/or bottarga. The bottarga will have a “fishier” flavor than the colatura. the lemon will bring the whole thing together. The colatura will amp up the umami.

This sounds delicious!

What will you use for your stock?

On a related note, I really like this domestic bottarga:


#26

Fish sauce dates back to the Roman Empire, which had a lot of varieties. It died out and was forgotten in most of Italy, but a few local traditions continued. They were virtually unknown elsewhere until maybe 15 years ago.

http://www.corriere.it/speciali/viedelgusto/campania/cetara/


#27

@ipsedixit @frommtron I will have to try it sometime. Assuming it’s just a touch of colatura right?

I once bought a tilefish and used the filet for sashimi etc. Head and bones made a wonderful stock, super gelatinous, it was basically a pot of aspic after a night in the fridge. Used the stock to make risotto ala Trattoria da Romano’s method on Bourdain’s Venice episode where they were tossing the risotto up in the air repeatedly to emulsify. Turned out very well.


#28

Sounds awesome. I remember that episode and the flying risotto. Pretty amazing technique.

I’m willing to bet I use more colatura and fish sauce than most. I can be heavy handed as a cook and I could basically drink nước chấm.


#29

yes


#30

Does eataly LA carry this?


#31

Yes, spotted this weekend at Century City:


#32

Also spotted at bay cities from Spanish company Matiz


#33

I was given a bottle of that for my birthday recently. Lovely stuff. The words “elegant,” “refined,” and “delicate” don’t sound like they’d go with “fish sauce,” do they? I can’t bring myself to use it for much more than annointing soft-boiled eggs and very simple uses like that, for fear it would be overwhelmed by more complicated preparations. As much as I like Red Boat fish sauce, there’s no comparison and I wouldn’t substitute the latter for the former.


#34

I think I posted this this elsewhere, but thought I would share here. From Sorrento’s in Culver City.

I haven’t tried it yet, but it was brought back from Italy by an Auntie, so I’m assuming it’s worthy. $18

Other than lemon risotto (which I am definitely making with the last of the Meyers from my neighbor’s tree), any suggestions on how to use this?


A Pasta Family's Flagship Arrives on the Westside - The Delightful Handmade Pastas of Pasta Sisters (Culver City) [Thoughts + Pics]
#35

I used my new sauce on leftover Pasta Sisters marinara pasta and loved it so much that I heated up a little bowl of mashed potatoes about half hour later and drizzled them with anchovy sauce because I wanted more. It’s so very good.

Now I will be obsessed with trying all the different available brands, and will probably end up with five different bottles. Thanks. :slight_smile: