Colatura di Alici? Where to buy in Los Angeles?


I know, right?

Plus, Koenigsegg is so damn low it won’t even make clearance at the street/driveway interface without a $10K+ undercarriage scratch. Yeesh. That egg run just got EGGSpensive (see what I did there?)…

And this is why we raise backyard chickens.


No, I’ve done it before.

The lemon balances it out, and Colatura is not really fishy to me, at least not quality Colatura.


I always learn something new on this board. I didn’t know the Italians had their own version of fish sauce…and I just saw it on a rerun of Zimmern’s Bizarre show tonight, too.


Bay City.


This is also my experience with colatura and/or bottarga. The bottarga will have a “fishier” flavor than the colatura. the lemon will bring the whole thing together. The colatura will amp up the umami.

This sounds delicious!

What will you use for your stock?

On a related note, I really like this domestic bottarga:


Fish sauce dates back to the Roman Empire, which had a lot of varieties. It died out and was forgotten in most of Italy, but a few local traditions continued. They were virtually unknown elsewhere until maybe 15 years ago.


@ipsedixit @frommtron I will have to try it sometime. Assuming it’s just a touch of colatura right?

I once bought a tilefish and used the filet for sashimi etc. Head and bones made a wonderful stock, super gelatinous, it was basically a pot of aspic after a night in the fridge. Used the stock to make risotto ala Trattoria da Romano’s method on Bourdain’s Venice episode where they were tossing the risotto up in the air repeatedly to emulsify. Turned out very well.


Sounds awesome. I remember that episode and the flying risotto. Pretty amazing technique.

I’m willing to bet I use more colatura and fish sauce than most. I can be heavy handed as a cook and I could basically drink nước chấm.




Does eataly LA carry this?