Dish of the Month (DoTM) – SEPTEMBER 2016 – THAI


#182

I actually almost never eat Chinese food unfortunately…I don’t know where the rest of you get all your information on them, and they close super early. I guess I am relying too much on my Thai experiences.

The few times I can think of having eaten at some Chinese places I think my extreme pale skin and blonde hair may have prompted them to give me silverware without me asking as well… hah

Even at a lot of my Vietnamese experiences they always seem to set down silverware…although I’ve never known what I should do with a fork/knife when eating pho.

Korean places usually give you a spoon at least, which usually makes sense.

Not sure, why, I just eat in the wrong places I guess… mea culpa


#183

re: VN food

Fork/spoon/knife is standard equipment for rice dishes. Chopsticks for everything else.

In general, if you are given a fork when you sit down at a normal Vietnamese restaurant by default and you did not order a rice dish, then you got stereotyped.

Even in a typical family style vietnamese dinner where rice is served in a family pot, chopsticks are standard equipment; rice is eaten using the bowl/shovel method.

In my experience, Thai/VN food are big on western AND eastern eating tools, whereas Chinese/Japanese/Korean is pretty chopstick dominant.


#184

Well, I look stereotypical as fuck so…guessing this happens to be all the time. I am but a product of my experiences sadly.


#185

Just an observation…

Growing up in Chinese household, rice is always eaten in a small bowl, held off the table, with chopsticks. It is very odd to me to eat rice/rice dish with chopsticks AND plate.
I have never seen a non-Chinese in all my years actually use the small bowl for rice.

Eating Thai food or Vietnamese broken rice I notice the utensils and on plates . This makes logical sense to me.

That 2 spoon comment made me LOL


#186

[quote=“JeetKuneBao, post:185, topic:4144”]
Growing up in Chinese household, rice is always eaten in a small bowl, held off the table, with chopsticks.
[/quote]My Japanese family members eat it that way. Maybe not always a small bowl, but held off the table, with chopsticks. Except when “grandma” makes her version of American breakfast: A plate of eggs, bacon and a dollop of starchy calrose rice.


#187

At home, I’ll eat pasta and salads with chopsticks. It’s so logical. (Sorry again, Italy.)


#188

Pasta IS from China, after all…


#189

Don’t stop pointing these things out to us.


#190

#191

I love their light noodle soups on hangover lunches


#192

Recently became obsessed over krapow. Can make a decent one at home. Still learning obviously. Spoke with 2 people of Thai descent on any tips and tricks…use chicken butt said one (genius! one day chicken butt will have its day.) and another said a mix of pork-shrimp. Another said don’t use soy sauce that’s for Chinese cooking.

Anyone know which restaurants are using Holy Basil?

Is it a seasonal thing?


#193

Pailin uses holy basil in their pad kee mao more often than not, so I would imagine that they use it in the kaprow too, but I’ve honestly never ordered it there. I’ll try to check it out next time I go.
when trying to buy holy basil at Silom, it’s almost never there and when I asked they said it was seasonal, but now I forget which season they told me


#194

Thank you for the intel!!

I’ll have to order pad kee mao and krapow next time I am at Pailin AND some Northern food as well!!

From what I heard from a few Thai restaurant operators…yes Holy Basil is available here in California, they grow it here in our state. So it’s not just a found only in Thailand thing. Summer time I heard is the season. What so special about Holy Basil being seasonal when sweet and Thai grows year around?


#195

Yeah it grows around here. You can even get a small plant from the Culver City farmers market on Tuesdays. I had a decent sized bush growing in my backyard until my chickens ravaged it.

It’s just a totally different plant, if you haven’t had it you really should. It’s kind of spicy, but not capscain or pepper hot. Very complex and herby. Just a handful of leaves in the pad kee mao really transform the dish