French Traditional in the city


#1

Seeking your advice for oldschool bistros and braseries . Looking to find saucy, stewed, soupy dishes :slight_smile:

It’s has been fairly easy to find modern french with all of the spots you’ve been suggesting in this subforum but I have to find something i’m craving that we just don’t have in LA. I have gone through many of the threads already.

Thanks


#2

See what you think of La Mirabelle.

lamirabellenyc.com


#3

thanks a bunch for this one!


#4

You’re welcome! There’s a server there who will sing La Vie En Rose if you ask (and maybe even if you don’t). In case the food alone isn’t French-y enough for you.


#5

oh boy… not looking for a theme restaurant… just some place that may have a proper Bouillabaisse or cassoulet


#6

Absolutely not a theme restaurant. Read the home page on the website.


#7

yea kind of teasing… it looks great and homey. the singing of popular tunes is a bit scary


#8

It’s a little kitschy, but it’s also pretty fabulous.


#9

La Grenouille and Benoit


#10

Beat me to it—I was going to suggest La Grenouille. Last month I enjoyed the most delectable frog legs (with instructions to eat them with my fingers; an elegant finger bowl was provided), foie gras and cheese soufflé. I had so much fun that we’re going again tomorrow after my daughter’s graduation. The first time I visited was around 30 years ago, when male patrons were required to wear a jacket and tie. I didn’t have them on so they graciously provided me with a boring solid blue tie and a too tight blazer, which I wore in good humor. Ties are no longer required but I believe jackets are encouraged. It’s not a dark, stuffy place, however. The restaurant is bright and beautiful, with fresh cut flowers everywhere. Spendy but highly recommended.


#11

Jackets are still required at Grenouille. Definitely not a bistro or brasserie, it is a very high end restaurant serving classic French cuisine (the last of the famous Le’s and La’s that once dotted the Manhattan culinary scene).

Benoit changed changed chefs two years ago, and she has reshaped the menu to include contemporary dishes while still offering some classic bistro fare.

I recommend Augustine (a bistro) and two brasseries, Boucherie (two locations) and Cafe d’Alsace, for old-style French food and Parisian ambiance.


#12

Thanks so much… booked 1 already


#13

Though their whole menu isn’t very “Classic” - Le Coucou is serving an awesome Quenelles de Brochet in a pitch-perfect Champagne beurre blanc with chervil. Fantastic with some vintage blanc de blancs. One of the best bites of the trip for me.


#14

Booked Mala Project, Cafe D’Alsace, Boucherie and Benoit


#15

@Nemroz, When I recommended Boucherie upthread, we had had one very good dinner at the Gramercy location. Last night, we went back there for a late meal. Unfortunately, this time some of our food was sub-par: a poor version of coq au vin and a dry as dust burger. Also, the coq au vin arrived at the table just as we were literally putting the last forkfuls of a shared salad in our mouths, i.e. terrible kitchen timing. Considering all this, I must rescind my Boucherie recommendation.


#16

It’s so great that you return to update your review. Thanks. We haven’t been to NYC in a year and a half. Need a trip.


#17

Thank you. I booked the west village location. skip it? got a replacement french? :slight_smile:


#18

The same chef is in charge of the kitchen at both Boucherie locations, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to keep that reservation.

As an alternative, I would suggest Chez Napoleon. It’s been around for many decades, pretty much the last of the small, old-style French bistros that once dotted the Theater District landscape. If you go, reserve after 8 p.m. to avoid the pre-theater rush and crush.


#19

Nice, thanks. Yes that was was on my radar when I first started doing the search.

I’m also ready to make one of the dinners non french :slight_smile: Booked Freemans. Any thoughts on that ?


#20

Re: Freemans. Nope. Never been.