NOW can avocado toast die?


#1

Oy, I weep for civilization.


#2

If you don’t like it, don’t eat it.

I think it’ll be around forever, like tomato toast.


#3

I like it just fine.Per the article:

Avocado toast might be one of the most annoying food trends from the last five years -and the fact that Millennials are buying it rather than homes doesn’t help. As if avocado toast wasn’t bad enough as a food (not that it’s bad, just its whole trendiness), it’s even more obnoxious as a Halloween costume.

Nothing wrong with avocado on toasted bread, but it needs to not be a ‘thing’. It takes zero skill. if you can make toast and peel/de-pit an avocado without hurting yourself, you too can make all the avocado toast you want, no hipster cafe required.


#4

Totally agreed - I stopped ordering avocado toast because of this. I just need to refrain another 11,500 times and I’ll have enough for that down payment.


#5

the problem is the bread. You buy this baller “artisan” bread and you’re out 8 bucks and you have this huge slab of bread from Loge or Clark Street or Bub & Grandma that’s big enough to feed 10 people but you still have to buy the avocado.


#6

It will never die, for as long as Mexican and Californian children have toasters.


#7

I love it and grew up with an avocado tree in the backyard.

Just don’t want to pay $10 for it, or wait in lines.


#8

That’s (part of) what I don’t get. I usually don’t order something out that I can make as well or better at home. Avocado toast? Nope.

I also read that the price has gone up 125%.


#9

Z-E-R-O?

Seems like at least a bit of skill required.

I think those in the ER would agree.


#10

I think people who cannot cut an avocado (or a bagel) without injuring themselves should not be allowed to handle knives. They can just buy a tub of guacamole and get presliced supermarket bagels and suffer.


#11

I had to text a friend with directions on how to cut an avocado a couple years ago. She lives in North Carolina, and thought you peel it first.


#12

But she called and asked someone who did know. Like an actual sensible person. And presumably, one with as much avocado toast as she wants AND all her appendages still in working order.


#13

The article from the Times of London and is about U.K. injury rates. When the U.S. Is mentioned, it is:

“Jezebel consulted with an orthopedic surgeon at NYU Langone’s Hand Center who called it a “classic injury” that hasn’t necessarily spiked in popularity, but is instead a seasonal injury (i.e. waves of people come in around the same time of year, such as Cinco de Mayo, when everyone is attempting to make guacamole).”

Cinco de Mayo kitchen injuries ≈ drunk cooking injuries


#14

I had never heard of Avocado Toast as a thing until last week. I’ve just always thought avocado or butter on what ever you are inclined or want at the moment. I’d never order it as a menu item unless I feel I’ve just got to have some avocado right now. It seems silly


#15

Have you been in a coma for three years?


#16

True. I think I’m the last one to notice trends but even I’ve seen it for a couple of years.


#17

I know one place that makes better avocado toast than I can make at home even if I buy the same bread and get the avocado from the same source.

Maybe the owner’s just better than I am at identifying avocados at the perfect state of ripeness.


#18

I thinks it is not so much the ripeness of th avocado (which can be done on a sunny kitchen table), but that some chefs are inventive with what they mix into the avocado. They are professionals, and play with flavor profiles and ingredients in a way the average home cook doesn’t.


#19

Avocado toast need consist of two ingredients plus salt. Toast + Avocado. If you want to get fancy, try some black pepper, a light sprinkling of chili flakes, or a small drizzle of good olive oil.

Or fine chopped green onions or chives or garlic etc etc etc…

This is not rocket surgery, people…


#20

I’ve watched them make the toast at the place I’m talking about. I did exactly the same thing at home. I buy the same olive oil, Marash pepper, and salt.