Rome Walking Food Tours


#1

This is our first time there. We’ve had a few people recommend walking food tours of Rome. In general this is not something I’d ever do. In a big new city I’d get recommendations from FTC’ers and visit eateries and landmarks on our own.

4 hours and about $100 per person. It seems interesting but the list of places aren’t ones that are necessarily on my list based on CH and FTC research.

Do you think its worth the investment in time and money? Or just go on our own?


#2

Which tour are you talking about? Which places does it visit?


#3

Da Enzo al 29
Spirito de Vino
Fatamorgana for gelato
Antica Caciara
La Renella for bread
Venazio for suppli’

Do you recommend any others instead?


#4

Pass. Do your own. “Food tours” are for non FTCers! :wink: And $100 is outright absurd IMO. You can eat really well for $100 for 2.

The best part about Rome is you can go end to end in 30-45 minutes.

Campo di Fiore- Forno di Campo di Fiore. Grab some Roman style pizza. Eat outside by the fountain (or back across the street to Piazza Navona). There is also a farmer’s market in Campo di Fiore.

Down the street from Campo di Fiore is Rosciolli. Great cured meats and cheese (60 month old Parmiggiano Reggiano). Make res for a dinner here.

Walk from Campo di Fiore to the Colosseum and you’ll pass the Jewish Quarters. Grab some fried artichokes there if you want.

Near the Colosseum is one of the best seafood restaurants anywhere, Tempio di Iside. Get the sculpin or/and whole crab spaghetti. The gamberi rosso crudo and blanched scampi are good. Sit downstairs in the grotto.

No joke, these scampi were larger than the utensils.

Loop back up towards Trevi Fountain and Spanish Steps.

Cross over Pantheon to La Campana for some traditional Roman fare. One of the oldest in town. Get the grilled porcini or white truffle pasta if in season.

Coda alla vaccinara (ox tail in the style of the butcher)

Don’t forget to feast on gelato.


#5

I think Katie Parla’s tour of Testaccio and Trastevere might be more interesting.


#6

I recommend Emma over Salumeria Roscioli (the deli-restaurant with table service). Same owners, much overlap on the menu, better service, more comfortable, fewer tourists.

Their takeout-only Antico Forno Roscioli is great, as is Forno Campo de’ Fiori. The latter has two shops right across the street from each other, one is just a bakery and the other has pizza by the slice with toppings.

The market in Campo de’ Fiori has few if any farmers left. There are two or three produce stands and a cheese stand which are handy if you’re staying nearby and have a kitchen. The rest is all tourist crap. If you want a great market, go to Testaccio. If you’re in that neighborhood, don’t miss Volpetti.


#7

True, fun to browse but I don’t think I’ve ever purchased anything there.

The good part about walking around is you’ll randomly stumble across a fish market or fruit market. Not that it matters unless you’ve rented an apartment. Which is something I would love to do in Rome and cook with some of the local ingredients.


#8

Thanks gents. Most of the recommendations for Rome are actually from both of you from either CH or FTC.

I would normally never consider something like this but I’ve had several people recommend a walking tour. Our Italian isn’t great and we are on unfamiliar territory so thought I’d get a 2nd opinion.

This is making me very hungry. I was able to secure a reservation for Dario Cecchini when in Tuscany and deciding on whether to take a day trip to Modena to Osteria Franciscana.


#9

A tour’s not a bad idea, but if you’re an experienced traveler and do your homework it’s not necessary either.

I’d spend more than a day in Modena, but it’s probably at the top of the list of places in Italy I haven’t been to yet.