The World’s 50 Best Restaurants


#1

According to some publication these are the World’s Best Restaurants.

Top 50 listed below:

  1. Osteria Francescana, Italy
  2. El Celler de Can Roca, Spain
  3. Mirazur, France
  4. Eleven Madison Park, New York City
  5. Gaggan, Thailand
  6. Central, Peru
  7. Maido, Peru
  8. Arpège, France
  9. Mugaritz, Spain
  10. Asador Etxebarri, Spain
  11. Quintonil, Mexico
  12. Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, New York
  13. Pujol, Mexico
  14. Steirereck, Austria
  15. White Rabbit, Russia
  16. Piazza Duomo, Italy
  17. Den, Japan
  18. Disfrutar, Spain
  19. Geranium, Denmark
  20. Attica, Australia
  21. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée, France
  22. Narisawa, Japan
  23. Le Calandre, Italy
  24. Ultraviolet, China
  25. Cosme, New York City
  26. Le Bernardin, New York City
  27. Boragó, Chile
  28. Odette, Singapore
  29. Alléno Paris au Pavillon Ledoyen, France
  30. D.O.M., Brazil
  31. Arzak, Spain
  32. Tickets, Spain
  33. The Clove Club, England
  34. Alinea, Chicago
  35. Maaemo, Norway
  36. Reale, Italy
  37. Restaurant Tim Raue, Germany
  38. Lyle’s, England
  39. Astrid y Gaston, Peru
  40. Septime, France
  41. Nihonryori RyuGin, Japan
  42. The Ledbury, England
  43. Azurmendi, Spain
  44. Mikla, Turkey
  45. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, England
  46. Saison, San Francisco
  47. Schloss Schauenstein, Switzerland
  48. Hiša Franko, Romania
  49. Nahm, Thailand
  50. The Test Kitchen, South Africa

#2

Thanks for typing it out - don’t wanna give San Pellegrino a single more click.


#3

Indeed. Which is why I don’t even mention them anywhere in the post.


#4

We’ve only been to Tickets in Barcelona. And it was superb.


#5

HIs book “Bread is Gold” is one of my favorite reads of the year. It’s not just the story of how he opened up a special soup kitchen - it’s the recipes and the stories that were created during that time. Inspiring and amazing.


#6

That’s wonderful! Thanks so much for sharing.


#7

I wish that we (as a culture, generally, not necessarily this site specifically) could get away from the obsession with Listology. Lists such as these are inherently flawed, and they’re often both overinclusive and underinclusive (as is the case here), present a narrow viewpoint, etc. However, a lot of the conversation against lists that you see in Comments sections is equally tiresome. Of course, these lists are hugely important for business, but I consider them to have as much substance as say new car rankings by a car magazine.


#8

Been to Francescana, Can Roca and Gaggan. All incredible restaurants and experiences, but my humble opinion (agreed to by my dining companion) is that Can Roca is a noticeable head above the others in all food-related categories. Service might be technically more impeccable at Francescana, but Francescana feels stuffier and less welcoming than Celler, which has outstanding service without feeling stuffy. I get the feeling that Can Roca is the truest spiritual successor to El Bulli.


#9

But do they do any harm? I find them marginally interesting. It’s not just restaurants. You name a subject and I’m betting there’s some kind of list.


#10

Nary Los Angeles. I guess we ain’t shit.


#11

An institutional bias against the kind of clean, market-based cooking of California chefs such as Suzanne Goin, Alice Waters and Nancy Silverton is regrettable but consistent.


#12

Thanks. That explains the mind set. IMO.


#13

Nah. We’re just not a white linen / fine utensil town. I don’t take it as a slight to L.A. - Actually it’s rather more a compliment.

Nevertheless, it would be drole to see a Gulfstream full of pink-shirted hedgies from London touching down at Santa Monica Airport, all intent on cutting in front of me in the queue for Ricky’s Fish Tacos.


#14

And I see it as neither a compliment nor a slight. As that article pointed out very clearly there’s a different mindset. IMO it’s neither good nor bad, just different.


#15

As Jonathan Gold noted, there are two new places that might be contenders for next year’s list.