What's easier than grilling things over charcoal?


#21

easy upgrade at any armenian meat shop such as Karabagh or Olive Fresh Marketplace.


#22

a bit of a drive from southern minnesota.


#23

I asked a Turkish guy I work with who does a lot of grilling about that, and he said it happens to him too.

That was the last time I used the wide skewers.


#24

our size skewers are the best. .there are also tricks to getting the meat to stick… you crimp the edges tightly, dont leave pockets, and put it on hot fire and rotate rotate right away so that it sets up


#25

Over the coals , wood or charcoal , hot and fast ,or super low and slow . Kudos to those who grill or smoke .


#27

Is there a difference in taste with propane vs natural gas?


#28

Not that we can tell.


#29

For gas grilling, propane, natural gas, and butane are indistinguishable.

A gas grill that’s dirty or not adjusted properly can have a yellow, smoky flame due to incomplete combustion of the fuel, resulting in an unpleasant sooty smell and taste. That’s pretty common at bad restaurants.


#30

Oh okay.

I have a weber kettle (coal, wood chips) for bbq and a portable (propane) for convenience or smaller stuff (whole fish, skewers). The only difference I find is the lack of the nice, smoky flavor when using propane instead of coal/wood. I’ve never noticed an overwhelming propane or gas flavor. In Asian bbq/grill restaurants I can sometimes detect the difference between the preferred binchotan (lump or wood coals) and the propane, butane, whatever, but not to the point of it being a meal killer. On the other hand I frequently come across an overwhelming and disappointing lighter fluid flavor from American coal/wood bbq restaurants.

With that said, as much as I’m tempted to get a really great gas grill with all the bells and whistles - one I would probably use more than the pain in the ass kettle - I would feel like it’s cheating.


#31

LOL. So I guess you grow all your own food and slaughter all your own meat cause, heaven knows, you wouldn’t want to cheat :slight_smile: As I’ve mentioned, in summer we sometimes use the grill five or six nights a week and cook just about the entire meal on it. I’m fine with cheating :wink:


#32

Okay, good for you. I’m not knocking the gas. Whenever we rent a bungalow or Airbnb and it has a gas grill I’m thrilled. But I’m leary of all the above mentioned carcinogens and am not a frequent griller or bbq-er. So when I do I want to work at it and get a little of that pit master feeling. :wink:


#33

Oh, I get it. I shared a recipe for BBQd ribs that’s done low and slow in the oven and was treated like a buffoon for suggesting that they were the best we’d ever done and would never do them any other way.


#34

I like oven baked ribs. They get really tender and the fatty, sweet, porkiness is not covered up by smoking. Then again, I’m from the east coast. We’re not exactly known for our BBQ.


#35

I’m from Atlanta and I think they did BBQ quite well. Here’s ‘my’ recipe.
https://www.ehow.com/how_4783765_ovenbaked-pork-ribs.html?utm_source=facebookADsKW&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=keywee&kwp_0=441800&kwp_4=1807534&kwp_1=768806


#37

I get very strong chemy stuff from gas grilling. What about the additives to gas to make us be able to smell it?


#38

I love these. Roasted ribs aren’t bbq per se


#39

LOL. From Wiki:

“Barbecuing techniques include smoking, roasting or baking, braising and grilling.”


#40

Not in the American vernacular though. Forgive the semantic bs. I don’t really care what’s called what


#41

I’m from the Southern US and for us it’s a very broad term.


#42

If you can smell it, the grill needs adjustment.