Eataly - Wagyu boneless ribeye

Starting a new topic rather than adding onto the giant existing Eataly thread. Was there for lunch today and saw that they have a sale this week on Snake River Farms Wagyu boneless ribeyes for 50% off. So $30/pound rather than $60.

Two part question: as someone who had never cooked a piece of meat remotely that expensive, should I give it a try? And if yes, what’s the best way to cook it? Hmmm maybe this belongs on the home cooking board. Thanks all.

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I definitely think people should NOT be scared of cooking steak at home, even if expensive. For thicker ribeyes, I go with the reverse sear method, using a combination of oven and cast iron pan to sear at the end. Google “reverse sear”. Make sure you have a reliable and quick reading food thermometer. I’ve only cooked wagyu beef a few time at home, but this method works well for ribeyes generally.

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Use your meat thermometer and do a reverse sear. (what DTLAeater said), basically slow cook the thick piece of meat in the oven at 200 degrees, once it hits its desired temperature, use your cast iron pan and sear it hard on both sides. (cast iron pan must be really really hot).

This

yes. And yes I fucked it up and ate an expensive piece of well done steak. I used a thermapen and reverse sear to boot.

In hindsight, less sear or thicker cut would have helped.

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Wagyu ribeye steak is disgusting.

Wagyu beef, given its exorbitant marbling, should only be eaten sliced thin with a quick dip in a shabu-shabu.

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Preach.

… well, maybe a thin cut placed on hot stone for a 2-3 second sizzle will also do.

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I’m with you on that. Makes great sushi. For a steak I’d much rather have old school corn-fed Midwestern-style. And bone-in, please.

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In your always humble opinion, of course.

Somewhat off topic, we had a burger made from this beef and it was the best burger we’ve ever had. And I’ve always been skeptical at the very least about this meat. It really was good.

It was definitely WAAAAY too much for me when I had a small portion cooked like a traditional steak.

I would probably sous vide it to rare and then pan-sear. I do need to try the reverse sear technique sometime as an experiment.

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Thanks everyone for your input and opinions. My takeaway so far is that reverse sear is the cooking method of choice. But this particular cut may not be worth buying even at a 50% discount.

Maybe. I don’t recall the Snake River Farms wagyu having the truly outrageous levels of marbling that the high-end stuff from Japan has.

You might be mistaking wagyu with A5 grade kobe or wagyu beef. Not all wagyu beef is created equal. You can find an MS3 score wagyu ribeye that is less marbled than a USDA Prime grade ribeye. And if you think a USDA prime ribeye is disgusting because it’s too marbled, then well…you just suck at steaks.

This is MS3 wagyu
image

It’s hard to say if $30/lb is worth it without knowing what kind of wagyu beef it is. But I can’t imagine Eataly selling the lowest grade wagyu so I imagine it’s pretty good stuff. If you’ve never had it, I highly recommend it. I’m a big fan of australian wagyu FWIW.

Absolutely give it a try, what’s the worst that can happen? :slight_smile:

I would sear it in a super hot cast iron, with much salt and pepper.

Here’s my go-to from jfood from CH:

I saw the wagyu when I was at Eataly this past Sunday purchasing steaks. Ended up with a porterhouse on sale and an excellent dry aged shell steak.

It on the far right of the picture below. It’s not crazy marbly like the A5s and not cut very thick either. You should be able to cook it like a regular steak.

steak

Then it’s just better to buy prime grade beef. It’ll most likely be less expensive, and arguably taste better.

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Here are some good links in regards to reverse searing, https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/03/how-to-reverse-sear-best-way-to-cook-steak.html, https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/cooking-temps-when-cook-hot-fast-when-cook-low-slow. I am not a fan of using a sous-vide on beef although I love it for pork or chicken. Here is my favorite method for steak, https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/cooking-tips/article/bobby-flay-porterhouse-steak-rules. I have used this technique with both rib-eyes and NY strips. Not sure it would work adding butter to the already copious fat of a wagyu, but its great for normal, prime meats (unless you ask ipsedixit who doesn’t like butter on beef). At any rate hope it turns out beautifully however you do it!