Akagai/Blood Clams sighting at Eataly

#1

@jperelmuter sourced from MA at Flatiron location.

Also in the produce section - Dutch white asparagus, morels and porcinis

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#2

That morel price has seemed about the going rate the last few years. Those look nice. Hopefully when wl get home we’ll have some in our markets. Off, topic, but a few years ago I actually had some leftover and,I don’t remember, if we were going away or what. I froze them and they cooked up fine. But, man, did they exude liquid as they thawed!

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#3

Nice! Looks like you bought some. How did you prepare them and how were they?

These are a related but distinct species from the Asian ones served in Japan. There is also a species of blood clam found along the west coast of Mexico. According to a friend who has tried all 3, there are discernible flavor differences.

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#4

I was planning to prepare them as sashimi, but alas they were too small size wise. Just ended up parboiling them and serving with sambal - they were good if you enjoy blood clams.

I think this variety from Massachusetts are closer in relation to the Japanese variety, the shell is more arched compared to the ones from Baja.

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#5

Too small? Sounds like a challenge to me! Hopefully they’ll still have 'em towards the end of next week.

Because I’m sure everyone wants to know the scientific names:

Akagai (Japanese ark shell clams) are Anadara broughtonii
Blood arks from Mass. are Anadara ovalis
And Mexican blood clams (or less glamorously “pustulose arks”) are Anadara tuberculosa

I couldn’t find any phylogenetic information (i.e. which are more closely related). Sure would be fun to do a side-by-side taste test of all three!

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Inn Ann @ Japan House
#6

Cool, thanks for the scientific names.

I think the ones used in sushi bars are likely the size of a fist vs these palm sized offerings. Just not enough real estate to cover a regular sized shari.

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#7

I’d treat as shinko; many little clams for 1 nigiri.

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