Baking steel


#1

Anyone used these? Prices on Amazon range from under $20 for one that’s 0.1" thick / 8 lbs. to $115 for 0.5" / 32 lbs.


#2

Link? I just signed up for Prime :slight_smile:


#3

Just search, there are a lot.


#4

Oops, I thought you had oops’ed :slight_smile:


#5

I’ve thought about going to a metal fabricator.


#6

I would lean towards the 1/2 inch . Thinking about retiring my Emille Henry baking stone for one of these. Is it really better. Any body use the steel and compared it to the stone or tile?


#7

I’d love to have a convo about this. I just have a plain ole pizza stone.


#8

thermal conductivity of steel is much higher than of stone (~20X) which means pizza for example will cook much faster.


#9

The only real downside to steel (vis-a-vis stone) is the cost.


#10

I know but it seems to be a much better tool in the long run . What it boasts is . It provides a quicker bake and better undercarriage.I am using a 70 percent hydration rate at the moment with bread flour in my dough recipe.


#11

I have a 1/2" Original Baking Steel that I bought during its Kickstarter phase. I like it much better than the two baking stones I had previously, not least because I have not yet been able to break the steel, as I did with both stones. It works very well for bread & pizza. The only drawbacks it has are that it’s heavy, and it gets a little rusty now and then, even though I work hard to keep it dry.


#12

Now I can’t remember what I wanted to do with it.


#13

There’s also this:


#14

And the weight and that they can rust. We got one and it’s not quite love. Also, the pizzas take one minute longer compared to our previous stone.


#15

Did you get the 1/2 " in thickness steel ?


#16

We did and now it’s a PITA to take in and out of the oven (P is tall and prefers to have the steel on a rack in the middle of the oven).