[NPR] David Chang and Ugly Delicious


#1

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/02/24/588031234/chef-david-chang-dishes-on-the-ugly-side-of-delicious-food


#2

Anyone start watching the show yet? I’m on episode 3 and really enjoying it.


#3

I like it, but the episodes are way long.


#4

“I hope you choke”

This is great.


#5

I watched them all. The pizza and fried chicken episodes were my favorite. The barbecue episode is great also.


#6

the first couple of episodes seemed a bit too long. I just finished the BBQ episode and thought that one came together well—also it seemed like the first episode that David seemed happy vs grumpy.


#7

Episode 4 has a scene at board favorite Dan Tana’s.

I’d like to eat at that Viejun place.

I want that whole pig with the fish sauce, too.


#8


#9

#10

ok real talk for a second, in the BBQ episode, how the hell do you clean/sanitize a table like the one APL is using?

Also the peking duck on that episode…O_O


#11

I don’t see where he put anything directly on a table, they used cutting boards.


#12

Coolest things I’ve seen so far on the series is Episode 4. Chris Shepherd’s whole hog smoker with… the BUILT IN FLIPPER!!!

I NEED THAT RIG!!!


#13

Some highlights for me:

  • the parody of Chef’s Table (opening of episode 7)
  • Nina Compton’s story about her husband telling her she could not put fried chicken and watermelon on her menu
  • David Simon defending appropriation

I was surprised to see OB Bear. I think of that place as a bar.


#14

watch it again


#15

That’s a butcher-block work table. You can see him cleaning it right around the three-minute mark. That garage-like space probably has a concrete floor with drains.


#16

You can heckle him in person tonight @ https://www.92y.org/event/ugly-delicious


#17

I found Serena Dai one of the more entertaining guests.


#18

There is some controversy regarding the cleanliness of wood cutting boards.
Tests show that surface of wood has fewer pathogens after wiping down with a disinfectant than plastic after the same treatment. Pathogens can remain deeper in the wood, so hard chopping has the potential to expose those pathogens. Plastic, it is believed, can be fully sanitized. Tests show, though, that pathogens can survive in deep knife marks and grooves. Some cities require plastic cutting boards and plastic/metal knife handles because of the perception that they can be fully sanitized.

tl;dr: treat the wood with a disinfectant, salt the wood, regularly treat the wood with food grade mineral oil and you’ll be just fine.


#19

The old government recommendation of plastic over wood was based on nothing but some idiot bureaucrat’s guess.

http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm


#20

Well now I want one but cleaning must be a giant pain.