What cake do you bake?


#21

Omg, I love you! I took a cake decorating class in high school for an “easy A” and failed miserably. :fist_right:


#22

Here is something I am quite adept at making (note the lack of frosting). :wink:


#23

I think there is a gene for cake frosting (same gene for present wrapping!) that I am missing, because I genuinely try to make the cakes look good!


#24

Do you use a strong, olive oil flavored oil for this or softer, more creamy flavored one?


#25

I used mild olive oil, the California brand you can find at any supermarket. I like the citrus flavor to come through.


#26

I never have baked a cake in My life . I would like to. What s my first lesson ?


#27

Calibrate your oven.

Make sure the temp is correct, and evenly dispersed throughout.


#28

Follow the recipe and measure the ingredients properly. Otherwise you may blow up the oven. This is science!

Have you ever baked anything?


#29

Come to think of it. I’m not sure I’ve ever baked a cake either. There’s one pie recipe of Mother’s that I make every few years and a ginger cookie that I make a little more often than that.


#30

This is an easy chocolate cake. I don’t like chocolate, so this is what I make when I have to.

Btw, it’s a Texas sheet cake, despite what the title says.


#31

Gotta ask. When and why do you ever HAVE to?


#32

Something along the same lines.

I love this cake with homemade mission fig jam, too.


#33

When people you love like chocolate, and you love them enough not to buy a supermarket cake, but not so much as to spend $40 at a bakery.


#34

Cake recipes aren’t forgiving of modifications or substitutions. Use a good recipe, make sure you have all the ingredients and hardware, and follow the instructions exactly. An Alton Brown recipe with video might be a good one to start with.


#35

Jam on cake is great. Americans seem overly enamoured of frosting.


#36

Agreed. This cake calls for frosting on top and jam on the inside.
But really, I prefer cakes without frosting.


#37

A lot of frostings are too sweet for me, though cooked ones such as seven-minute icing and French buttercream can be very good, as can the cream cheese frosting traditional on carrot cake.

I serve the Joy of Cooking’s devil’s food Cockaigne with unsweetened, barely sweetened, or boozy whipped cream.


#38

Honestly, I would start with cookies and a scale (if you don’t have one already). Chocolate chip cookies using the best ingredients. By that I mean good quality chocolate (14oz not 12, hand chopped if you have patience or large chips), and dark muscovado sugar or molasses sugar for brown sugar, and at least 50% more nuts, pecans or walnuts (I don’t chop them, I let my kitchen aid mixer break them down). I consistently get told I make the best chocolate chip cookies, though maybe they just feel sorry for my sad frosting jobs.:grimacing:

After you make the dough, only cook as many as you will eat in a day. Save the rest of the dough in the fridge. It will easily keep for a week, and I’ve kept for two weeks without any change to the cookie quality, though cold dough does take a few minutes longer to cook.

After you gain confidence with cookies, I’d move to brownies, then cake.

recipe I use - husband’s mother wrote it up for him when he went away to college (i double the vanilla and use butter and shortening for a crispy cookie with a slight rise)

I use these brown sugars

Or snickerdoodles!

Then brownies!


#39

Goddamn. :heart_eyes:


#40

In my limited experience with Joy of Cooking’s recipes marked “Cockaigne”, the word is synonymous with “fussy, and a major PITA”. YMMV.