When NYC Restaurants Come to L.A., Chefs Have to Spice Things Up ("If it's not in a tortilla, they freak out.")

At the NoMad, which opened downtown in early 2018, about 90 percent of the menu is different than the Big Apple original. Chef de cuisine Rudy Lopez says that’s because “people like to eat simple [here]. … If it’s not in a tortilla, they freak out.”

fify

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Maybe your food just sucks and we can see right through your “NYC is the best” attitude,
Stop coming here and perpetuating your East Coast sensibility.

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The vaunted NoMad chicken was the biggest “Emperor’s new clothes” dish in L.A. that year.

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I thought the article was complimentary toward Angelenos. No?

Now it’s a $62 chicken stuffed with lemons and rice. No more truffles or fois gras, because we prefer “simple food”.

you peasants :grin:

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I wonder if those comments would sound marginally less stupid if we had the whole transcript of his remarks for context.

Um, no, because CA banned foie gras. Sheesh, so much defensiveness on this thread!

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I don’t consider “simple” as derogatory when describing food.

“says Zaric, who adds that he gets far more reservation no-shows in L.A. than in other cities. “It’s very frustrating,” he gripes, attributing the behavior to Angelenos making multiple reservations and being more interested in celeb encounters”.

you know who is more interested in celeb encounters? People not from LA.

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Ummm, I know, but it was my understanding that they didn’t fois even before the final decision? And that doesn’t explain the truffles.

No reports of Nomad serving foie at the LA location, even though when they opened the ban had been suspended pending resolution of the lawsuit. The LA version of the chicken did have truffles.

@Bookwich Here’s the quote from the article: After California’s foie gras ban went into effect earlier this year, Lopez reimagined the bird, and it’s now stuffed with lemon, Parmesan, and bread crumbs. “It’s a lot more popular,” says Lopez of the newer, brighter dish."

I think you’re just looking for a reason to be insulted. Because if the theme of the article was “Guy opens carbon copy of his New York restaurant in LA, 'cause LA and NY diners like exactly the same things,” you’d be just as sputtery about that.

No, I wouldn’t. I love momofuku, I think Chang and his exec chef did a great job bringing their aesthetic to Los Angeles.

Roberta’s gave us a pizza place with a boring, predictable menu. It’s good, but hardly interesting.

I appreciate when people make an effort, instead of simply trying to cash in on a name or reputation.

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Fair enough. Then I’m still trying to figure out what you and @Hungrydrunk object to in the article.Other than the tortilla thing, and the celebrity thing, which I also think is dumbass.

Yeah, it was the condescension and arrogance that put me off.

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i don’t object to the article, just certain things that were said by the chefs.
like Bookwich, it was their condescension that annoyed me.

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If it’s any comfort, I have a vague recollection of Shaun Hergatt (from Australia, in case you’re interested) leaving his restaurant Sho because New Yorkers “couldn’t understand” what he was trying to do. I ate there. As far as I could tell, what he was trying to do was feed people the kind of sushi they could get in a zillion other places. And also lettuce cups, which in his defense, I don’t think you can get in Manhattan, 'cause we don’t have a PF Chang’s.

ETA It’s not SHO. I’m thinking of something else. But the rest of the story is true!
ETA again. Now I’m pretty sure it was a Stephen Starr (from Philly) restaurant. It had a really weird sculpture hanging from the ceiling.
ETA yet again. It was Shang! The chef was Susur Lee.From Toronto. I really should think first and post second.

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